Moon Coil Media

November 22, 2022

Darkwave/goth rock band, Raven Said was recently featured on Onyx Music Reviews for their new EP, ‘Chants To Dissolve’.  You can read the review below but we’d appreciate you going to their site and checking out their content.

https://bit.ly/3Vf0LVU – direct link to the review

In the City of Ekaterinburg, you will find gothic rockers, Raven Said, and October saw their new EP, Chants To Dissolve released by Moon Coil Media, plus they had the very talented Pete Burns (Kill Shelter) on mastering. Raven Said are Andrey Agapitov (vocals, guitar, bass, acoustic guitar) and Maria Agapitova (piano, synth, percussion).

The first track has a very interesting pulsating marrying of almost techno beats and gothic rock. There are sparkling synths with flourishing jangly guitar in “A Flowering And A Flattering“.”Transparent Sorrow” features the beautifully sensual vocals of Aeleth Kaven from La Scaltra, so very light and angelic in stark contrast to Agapitov’s deeper tones. This track reminded me of the bands coming out in the second goth wave of the early 90s.

Really amazing bass lines wander through “Except My Love For Her (Cold Desire Version)“. I dare you to forget the chorus as it pretty unique and a very sweet way to admit to being very much in love…..in a very goth way. There is such a violent life to “Srendi Vashtar“, from the guitar and the voracious electronics, to the urgently lowkey vocals spurred on by the smashing percussion. The last track is the shimmering “Immersive Waves” with the haunting guitars and vocals. The guitar work is simply delightful, tinkling like broken glass, over and over again.

Music brings us together like virtually nothing else on the planet. It can feed our souls and connect us on such a primal level. Raven Said are creating dark gothic rock that really is like broken glass, fragile and shinny but if you try to take them into your heart, you might slowly die from the way they cut you up…. or not. It is about depths you feel this style of music in your psyche. New and yet familiar to those of us that live our lives in black. Now there are Chants To Dissolve with, so the Raven Said.

Chants to Dissolve | Raven Said (bandcamp.com)

Raven Said | Yekaterinburg | Facebook

Raven Said (@ravensaidband) • Instagram photos and videos

November 21, 2022

SMORG Magazine was kind enough to feature The Bleak Assembly and a review of their EP, We Become Strangers.

https://bit.ly/3AX0hMH

Here’s a screenshot of the article but we’d be grateful if you went to the site.  They have a lot of great content – music reviews and such.  Check Smorg Magazine HERE:

To grab the EP:

https://thebleakassembly.bandcamp.com/album/we-become-strangers

November 16, 2022

Terra Relicta ‘Cover Son’ Compilation Submissions

Dear bands/musicians,

Here we go (hopefully, you too, or we go in vain) with another Terra Relicta compilation – the second one this year, as in custom for Terra Relicta to release two per year (in the summer and winter solstice). We decided to go with cover songs this time, and, as far as we’re concerned, the only condition is that your cover song fits Terra Relicta‘s music orientation. Though, mind other parties’ conditions (royalties, labels).

We appeal to all of you willing to submit your best or only cover song to do it by Friday, 9 December, by sending it to jerneja@terrarelicta.com

The compilation will be released on 21 December digitally on Bandcamp (download-free or “name your price”). We’ll keep you informed of its progress – therefore, stay tuned to Terra Relicta dark music web magazine and radio!

Upcoming COMPILATION track’s REQUIREMENTS:
– cover song
– genres fitting Terra Relicta’s dark music orientation: dark rock, dark metal, gothic, doom, symphonic, industrial, darkwave, dark electro, dark pop, neofolk, post-punk, black metal, alternative and related genres
– Wav format (with info: band, track’s title and its original performer)
– high-resolution band photo (square shape, min. 600 x 600 px)
– web-links (official website, Facebook,…)
– submission deadline: 9 December 2022
– submit to jerneja@terrarelicta.com (also the contact for additional info)

Thank you!

 

November 2, 2022

Lisa Hammer‘s ‘Dakini’ Re-Released album was recently given a very thoughtful review on Aural Aggravation.  We’d appreciate if you went directly to their site via the link below.  However, here’s the text as well.

https://bit.ly/3sQHs9l

Dakini, the debut album by Lisa Hammer (Requiem In White, Mors Syphilitica) was originally released back in 2009. It’s been described as ‘music for ritual, introspection and awakening of the senses’, ‘a complete manifesto of inner search in which a lot of influences from different genres of music’, and that it was ‘designed to carry the listener away from the manifest world and into a deeper space’.

Re-released here on limited cultured vinyl as an expanded release with three additional tracks, it provides an ideal opportunity for existing fans to re-evaluate, and reacquaint themselves, and for latecomers to be introduced.

It happens that I’m in the latter camp, and so am coming to the album with fresh ears, and only the facts that it’s pitched as being for fans of Dead Can Dance while promising ‘unprecedented vocals, sometimes angelic and sometimes damned as if they come from another period forgotten by the time.

Now, one might ask, if the original release was a ‘complete manifesto’, is the inclusion of additional tracks not gilding the lily? Especially when considering that ‘the Indian ragas correspond with times of the day, so the album represents a condensed 24 hours, which is perfect for ritual, or any emotional and spiritual trip.’ In context, there is the question off how to assimilate the additional material in the least obtrusive way, with the least impact on the flow that is so integral to the original concept?

Opening the album with a new, seven-minute ‘Alte Clamat Epicurus’ works nicely; it’s an evocative vocal incantation with a sparse droning backing. It sounds – in the mind’s eye, and with a small soupçon of imagination – like a sunrise, like an awakening. Hammer sounds both otherworldly and most incredibly earthy, which is no small feat – but then, I find that this is something particular to music, particularly vocalisations, which tap into echoes of ancient spirituality. While exalting the heavens, there feels as though there is a deeper connection with the ground, the rocks, trees, the elements. It paves the way perfectly for ‘In Taberna Quando Sumus’; simple, rhythmic, repetitive. As the album progresses, one becomes attuned to the sense of an arc, of a cycle, and Hammer leads the listener on a journey inside. Some of the musical arrangements are so minimal as to be barely there, the sound of the wind and cavernous reverberations, while others are centred around hypnotic percussion and wordless choral vocalisations, as on the powerful ‘Samsara’ and the lilting, ethereal ‘Vajra’.

That flow is disrupted somewhat with a dance mix of ‘Chant Nr 5’ dropped as the fourteenth track at the end of side three. In the sense that it bookends the side, which opens with the original version, it makes some sort of sense, but still… it’s incongruous, sweeping away the drifting incense with a busy beat and quavering organ tone. Perhaps this is why I’m always hesitant to use the term ‘world’ music: it’s such a western-centric view of the globe, where ‘the world’ is vast and the west occupies only a sliver of it, both geographically and culturally. In the west, the west is the world and perceives its cultural dominance as such. It’s a badly skewed perspective.

While Dakini incorporates elements of what would commonly be described as ‘world’ music, it’s really ‘world’ music in that it truly embraces music from the world in its full breadth, with the delicate sing-song of ‘Lullaby’ perhaps owing more to western traditions and showing that for Hammer, all sources are equal, and it makes for a rich and moving listening experience.

Side four ends, and closes the album, with the third and final bonus track, ‘Hurdy Gurdy Gavotte’. And there, it sits perfectly.

 

For more information about Lisa:

https://www.facebook.com/TheLisaHammer

https://www.lisahammer.com/